• Misdemeanors– Misdemeanors are lesser crimes with punishments ranging from a fine only to up to a year in county jail with a $4,000.00 fine. Misdemeanors are divided into three classes: A, B, and C, with Class C Misdemeanors carrying the lightest punishment. An attorney can help you navigate the criminal justice system and ensure that all rights are protected. It is a good idea to hire a Dallas criminal attorney, because a punishment that may seem inconsequential now can come back to haunt you in the future if it is not handled correctly from the outset.
  • DWI– In Texas, the blood alcohol (BAC) limit for driving is 0.08. If you are arrested for driving with a BAC over the limit or if you refuse to take the breathalyzer, your driver license can be suspended, and you will most likely be charged with Driving While Intoxicated (DWI). Unlike many criminal charges, a DWI charge carries with it collateral consequences that can affect your driver license, your job, and your freedom. Our Dallas criminal attorneys are experienced and prepared to help you fight you DWI case.
  • Felonies– Felonies are more serious crimes, which encompass a large number of criminal acts from repeat DWI offenses to capital murder. The punishments generally range from 180 days in state jail to life imprisonment or the death penalty. In addition to confinement, felonies can also result in fines, usually up to $10,000.00 and sometimes more. Felonies are generally classified as: Capital (providing for the death penalty), 1st Degree, 2nd Degree, 3rd Degree, and State Jail (from harshest to lightest punishment ranges). If facing a felony charge, an attorney is necessary to assist you with all aspects of your case. An experienced criminal lawyer in Dallas can help you understand your case, your options, serve as a strong advocate for you with the prosecution, protect your constitutional rights, and defend your case in court.
  • White-Collar Crime – White-collar crime is typically non-violent crime committed by business and government professionals. White-collar crime involves fraud, theft, and/or embezzlement from a business organization. The severity of the offense depends on the amount of money in question.
  • Family Violence – Texas law distinguishes assaultive offenses committed against a family member, a member of a person’s household, or a person somebody is currently dating or dated in the past. If the state alleges Family Violence, a person will face additional consequences such as never being able to own a firearm, or potential punishment enhancements for future offenses.
  • Protective Orders – Much like a civil protective order, an attorney representing the State may apply to take out a protective order against a person preventing them from coming into contact with another party if the prosecutor believes that family violence is likely to occur.
  • Expunctions– In certain situations, you may be eligible to have the records of an arrest expunged (or destroyed) so you can legally deny the existence of the arrest in most situations. An expunction can become invaluable as you try to overcome a mistake.
  • Orders of Non-Disclosure – In some situations, you may not be eligible for an expunction, but you still may qualify for an Order of Non-Disclosure. Records that fall under an Order of Non-Disclosure cannot be viewed by the public, but can still be used by law enforcement and governmental agencies. A person whose criminal history has been sealed by an Order of Non-Disclosure is not required to mention, in any application for employment, information, or licensing with the state, that the person has been the subject of any criminal proceeding that is subject to the order. An Order of Non-disclosure can be quite a benefit as you move forward and try to leave the mistakes of your past behind.
  • Courts-Martial – If you served in the armed forces, a court-martial is the process used to determine guilt (and if found guilty, punishment). Courts-Martial are very similar to civilian criminal justice in that the government must bring a formal accusation against a soldier and has the burden of proving those allegations. It is different from a civilian trial in that typically courts-martial are comprised of a panel of soldiers to decide guilt instead of a jury of peers.